The Trees of Fredericton

Awarded in 2007
The Trees of Fredericton

The history of civic tree-planting in Fredericton goes back to the mid-1800s, when soldiers of the British Garrison, even though forests filled their horizons, determined to enhance the streetscapes and public lands of the town with more trees. Later, after Arbor Day was born in the 1870s, Mayor George P. Fenety of Fredericton became an enthusiastic participant, giving rise to a tradition that continues to this day. For many years, the city planted American elms, but in recent decades the tree species have been more diversified. Private property owners have made their contribution, too, and this combined arboreal legacy is one of the Capital's cherished icons. The broad canopy of leafy, overhanging trees, best viewed from the university campuses above the city, is why Fredericton has long been described as a "last surviving hometown of America."