Pointe Sainte-Anne

Awarded in 2009
Pointe Sainte-Anne

Like many older cities, Fredericton is a composite of former communities once known by their own names. Of these, none is more historic than Pointe Sainte-Anne. It is the large flatland upon which Government House sits above the St. John River in the western part of town. In ancient days, it was, for thousands of years, the territory of the Wolastoqiyik people. Later, it became the site of a thriving Acadian settlement that was named Sainte-Anne. In 1755, some of the victims of the Acadian Expulsion found refuge there. But, four years later, the New England Rangers burned it to the ground, and, after that, British influence gradually became dominant, especially with the arrival of the United Empire Loyalists in 1783. When Thomas Carleton became New Brunswick's first governor, he built a mansion for himself at Sainte-Anne, and it served as his official residence until it burned in 1825. Meanwhile, the composition of the town changed and so did its name, from Sainte-Anne to Frederick's Town to Fredericton. But we must not forget the nexus of its roots, from Aboriginal to Acadian to Loyalist to today's broadening ethnic mix.